Wai-titi Landing

Wai-titi Landing Path Upgrading

The timber in the path at Wai-titi landing has reached the end of its life, and we are in the process of upgrading it with engraved concrete.

Pou Whenua sculptor Ra Vincent will complete the decorative engraving by December 2014.

Waititi Park - illustration by Stantiall Studio.

Waititi Park - illustration by Stantiall Studio

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In 2004, the Council worked with the Wellington Tenths Trust to develop a park at Wai-titi Landing. The site was once a waka landing beach used by Te Atiawa and other Taranaki Tribes and Taranaki Whanui in pre-European times.

The Council agreed to the development, on the corner of Molesworth Street and Lambton Quay, after the Wellington Tenths Trust offered a Gift-of-Significance to the city to recognise the site’s heritage.

Design

The Tenths Trust gifted twin 6.3-metre Pou Whenua (tribal boundary markers) designed by Te Atiawa sculptor Ra Vincent. The Pou Whenua stand as if on the former beach, symbolising upturned waka. The perimeter of the site is landscaped with plantings.

The park was designed to create an oasis of calm within the city centre. Features include:

  • Figures on the Pou Whenua - symbolising the people of the land they stand on.
  • A kowhai design - reflected on the inner surfaces of the Pou Whenua and representing the wairua (spirit of the land).

Opening

On 13 December 2004, Wai-titi Landing was officially opened by the former Prime Minister Helen Clark, former Wellington Mayor Kerry Prendergast and representatives of the Wellington Tenths Trust.

Budget

The Council granted the project $220,000 in the 2003/04 Long Term Council Community Plan.